Posts Tagged ‘Texas’

Benefits of Property Taxes

Published by Research Editor on August 12th, 2013 - in Taxes

Property taxes are high, especially in Texas, where we have the 14th highest property tax rate in America.

But when you factor in your entire tax burden, including sales, property, and income taxes, Texas ranks 6th lowest in the nation.

You already know that property taxes bring revenue to the government, which pays for all sorts of benefits. But what other benefits are there to property taxes? Charles Gilliland, David Adame, and Michael Oberrender answered our question in an excellent article entitled “In Defense of the Property Tax.”

Stable Revenue

In the article, the authors state, “Because property values change slowly, the property tax base is more stable than income and sales taxes.” A stable revenue means a stable government, which is beneficial all around.

To compare, a study found that sales taxes varied by more than 40% between 2000 and 2011. It would be hard for a government to function well on such wildly varying revenue.

Lower Taxes

Even though property taxes are high, our overall tax burden is nearly the lowest in America. How can this be? The article quotes a report that suggests that, if sales tax were to completely replace property tax, the sales tax would have to be 25% just to maintain current revenue.

A lower sales tax–of 11%–would be possible, but only if the tax base was expanded by taxing everything not currently taxed, including food, medicine, and real estate.

Either way, a skyrocketing sales tax would offset any savings from eliminating a property tax.

Economic Growth

Furthermore, the “In Defense of the Property Tax” article examines a study by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development on 21 countries, which suggests that higher sales taxes would not benefit the economy. “Property taxes, and particularly recurrent taxes on immovable property, seem to be the most growth friendly,” the study concludes.

Beneficial for All

Even though property taxes are high, they benefit Texas by providing a stable revenue, keeping taxes lower, and sparking economic growth.

Texas Needs You.

Published by Research Editor on March 19th, 2013 - in Loans

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Texas needs you.

As a property owner, you know first-hand that home and business owners sometimes need a little extra help or a little extra time to pay their property taxes. When that happens, Tax Lien Transfers are a flexible, affordable option.

But all of that may change, unless you help right now.

Powerful collection law firms and certain banks are trying to pass legislation in Texas that would kill the Tax Lien Transfer business and take away this affordable option for you.

This is bad news for the 15,000 Texans helped by Tax Lien Transfers each year. And it’s bad news for our communities, which rely on property tax payments to provide essential services such as schools, hospitals and first responders.

Join our coalition to help Texans fight for property rights!

A group of concerned business owners, property owners and Tax Lien Transfer employees across the state have joined together to protect our rights and our property – and we need your support.

Visit www.protectmytexasproperty.org and sign up for the coalition. It takes just 30 seconds. We’ll list you as a member on the website and notify you of ways you can engage with your elected officials, if you want. The only way to fight these powerful special interests is to ban together to stop them from destroying an industry that helps people stay in their homes, keep their land and stay in business.

Thank you for helping.

Sincerely,
FYP, LLC

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Harris County Property Taxes

Published by Research Editor on October 28th, 2011 - in Harris, Local taxes

Harris County has collected its property tax information on a single website, hcad.org. This website is well organized to help you with your property taxes in Harris County. The Resources tab is probably the best place to start browsing. It lists links within its own website to important pages, like information about protests before the ARB, the tax calendar for Harris County, and homeowners exemptions.

Also of interest on the site:

Dallas County Property Taxes

Published by Research Editor on October 13th, 2011 - in Dallas, Local taxes

Dallas county outline "dallas county property taxes"

Is your property in Dallas County? The county’s websites provide a wealth of information that you may find useful. The official Dallas County Website, for everyone in Dallas county, covers:

The Dallas Central Appraisal District website has even more information, devoted to property taxes:

Tarrant County Property Taxes

Published by Research Editor on September 3rd, 2011 - in Local taxes, Tarrant

Tarrant county outline  and word art saying Tarrant county property taxes

Is your property in Tarrant County? The county’s two websites–Tarrant Appraisal District and Tarrant County–provide a wealth of information that you may find useful:

You can pay your Tarrant County property taxes online. However, there is a convenience fee charged by credit card companies.

Search for your property tax account. You can see your current property tax statement, pay your taxes online, and see the tax history for your property. My home, for example, started with $2,700 in property taxes and peaked in 2008 with $4,200 in property taxes.

Access forms and applications online, including exemption, notice of protest, and rendition forms.

The Tax Estimator Calculator lets you see how your Tarrant county property taxes would change if the value of your house changed, if your exemptions changed, or if you lived in a different city or school district.Payment options. All taxpayers in Tarrant county can choose to play half their taxes before December 1 and the other half by July 1. This is a good option if you are unable to pay the balance by January 31 but do not wish to get a property tax loan.

See the protest process for Tarrant County. While we have a general overview of the protest process on FYPLLC.com, each county has its specific processes.

Tarrant County tax rates for each taxing entity (cities, towns, school districts, college, hospital, and water districts).

Deed history cards. Instead of trekking to downtown Fort Worth to view deed history cards, you can view them online. These show property tax records, ownership, and property history prior to 1984.
© 2013 FYP, LLC.